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Screen Shot 2015-01-22 at 9.33.06 PMJoin Antioch Core Faculty David Sobel and Tom Julius at the 2015 Green Schools National Conference, March 5-6, in Virginia Beach, Virginia!

As the only national conference bringing together experts and stakeholders to influence sustainability throughout K-12 schools and school districts, the annual Green Schools National Conference has grown in terms of attendance and scope.  Colleagues who share their passion and offer their own green schools experiences collaborate with thought leaders and early adopters of green school best practices. Attendees are passionate about transforming schools.  The annual conference is designed to share creative strategies for success so attendees can take home real-life tools that can transform schools.

“This year’s Green Schools National Conference focuses on how any K-12 educational institution—private, public, charter, or public charter—can adopt very simple, affordable practices to green their school,” says Jennifer Seydel, executive director of Green Schools National Network. “As the Virginia Beach district has demonstrated, it doesn’t take a multi-million dollar budget or years of planning. It only takes a commitment and can begin with easy-to-implement programs and policies that can make a big difference.”

Antioch’s David Sobel will lead two breakout sessions. During his first session “Nature-based Early Childhood in North America” on March 5 at 10:00 am, participants will explore the academification of kindergarten in the United States and the growing movement to “naturalize” early childhood with a focus on helping children develop initiative and grit. The session will include an outdoors activity, as well as a discussion about the value of letting children get their hands dirty and their feet wet.

Sobel will also participate as a co-presenter in “Updating the National Action Plan or Educating for Sustainability” on Thursday at 2:00 pm along with Jaimie Cloud, president, The Cloud Institute for Sustainability Education; Lisa Kensler, associate professor, Auburn University; and Jenny Wiedower, K-12 manager, The Center for Green Schools at USGBC. During this session, attendees will work along Work alongside the leading minds and the strongest champions of sustainability education to make updates and modifications to the National Action Plan for Educating for Sustainability, and understand your unique role and contribution to advancing the shared vision of graduating all students educated for sustainability by 2040.

More than 1,200 attendees are expected including people from all walks of “green” including teachers, students, school administrators from all levels, business community leaders, architects, environmental services, consultants, corporate partners, curriculum specialists, custodial supervisors, governmental agencies, environmental educators, finance specialists, school food service personnel, green building professionals, green team members, school habitat specialists, transportation managers, parents, health and safety coordinators, sustainability managers, and many others.

The Green Schools National Network has created a “culture of collaboration,” as a result of year-round networking and partnerships, and through an annual national conference.  We bring together like-minded people committed to the creation and support of healthy, green and sustainable schools.

For more information on the upcoming conference and the complete schedule, visit greenschoolsnationalnetwork.org/conference/

About the Green Schools National Network: The Green Schools National Network (GSNN) advances the national green and healthy schools movement by connecting like-minded and passionate education, non-profit, corporate and public sector individuals and organizations. GSNN is nationally recognized as the premier partner in advancing collaboration to integrate a green and healthy culture in schools and ensure that current and future generation of students are environmentally literate as well as practice and promote sustainability in their community.

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What factors lead to a healthy, sustainable culture where students, teachers, parents, staff, and administration can flourish and learn?

In this video Antioch University New England alumnus Alex Shevrin talks about how “when we open ourselves up to true, intentional relationships with our students, we make space for them to grow. Through intentional choices, we can empower ourselves and our students to achieve more than any of us thought was possible.”

Shevrin presented “”Unconditional Positive Regard” at MTA ED Talks: Big Ideas About Education on August 4, 2014, in Williamstown, Mass. She is a teacher/leader at a small, independent, therapeutic, alternative high school in Vermont. Shevrin blogs at shevtech.wordpress.com. You can find her on Twitter, @shevtech.

Bob Gliner’s film, Schools That Change Communities, is about schools as they should be. In this pedagogical age of “time on task,” “direct instruction” and a short-sighted emphasis on “Drill, Baby, Drill,” Bob shows that school improvement can be healthy, engaging and lead to significant community involvement and improvement.Most often when I watch educational videos, I get choked up with anger about the wrong-headedness of the No Child Left Behind educational philosophy. Watching this film, I got choked up because Bob shows schools that manage a combination of academic rigor, community purpose and heart that is right on the money.
Check out the Schools That Change Communities trailer below.
David Sobel

Rethinking Schools and the Zinn Education Project are partnering with an exciting project: This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate. You can get involved by participating in the K-12 teachers  This Changes Everything Writing Retreat. Here’s a sample from their website announcement:

thischangeseverything_collageImagining solutions to the climate crisis involves imagining solutions to a host of other social problems, from economic inequality to public health to job creation to indigenous rights—even to the quality of the food we eat. As the This Changes Everything team writes: “Climate change is more than an issue, it’s a message, one that is telling us that many of our culture’s most cherished ideas about our place in the world—from the quest for endless economic growth to the assumption of Western supremacy to the limitless capacity of humans to dominate nature—are no longer viable.” Rethinking Schools editorializes: “Confronting the climate emergency … demands that young people exercise their utopian imaginations to consider alternatives of all kinds.”

 

From our friends at the U.S Green Building Council!Screen Shot 2014-05-14 at 12.38.35 PM

Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 4.08.41 PMWe all have a passion for education. Where we learn matters. The Center for Green Schools at the U.S Green Building Council is inviting communities from around the world to take action on school campuses for the Third Annual Green Apple Day of Service in fall 2014. On the Day of Service, students, teachers, and community members are encouraged to plan a school-wide sustainability project utilizing local volunteers to create a positive environmental change.

 

In the first two years, over 3,000 Green Apple Day of Service events took place in more than 41 countries.Projects included planting school gardens, collaborating on clean-ups, or hosting e-waste recycling drives. Schools also create custom projects that cater to their community’s specific needs. Learn about more project ideas that will happen in schools around the world.

Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 4.09.16 PM Green Apple Day of Service creates awareness around the importance of green schools and propels a movement emphasizing sustainable lifestyles for youth and generations to come. Schools are invited to register green projects, and read more about this transformative campaign at mygreenapple.org

Forest and Nature Schools
A message from our friends north of the border:
A year ago three partner organizations, (Forest School Canada, Child and Nature Alliance, and Focus on Forests), one funder (TD Friends of the Environment Foundation), one editor, as well as sixteen educators from across Canada all set out to develop a Forest and Nature School Guide. After many months of collaboration, dialogue, debate, writing and editing we’re happy to launch “FOREST AND NATURE SCHOOL IN CANADA: A Head, Heart, Hands Approach to Outdoor Learning.”
 
In these pages, you will find out more on the ethos of Forest and Nature School as it relates to a Canadian context, as well as what it looks like in practice. We weave together principles, storytelling, place-based learning, play, and notions of risk like you’ve never seen it before! I’m confident this guide will be relevant to your work, and that together we’re all making a difference at connecting children to the natural world!
Please share this widely in your networks, and a big thank you to everyone involved in creating something magical. Also, we’re very grateful to David Sobel for writing the preface to this guide, as well as Robert Bateman who opened up the discussion on our blog today on the importance of Forest and Nature School in Canada! To see the blog post, click here: http://www.forestschoolcanada.ca/uncategorized/forest-and-nature-school-by-robert-bateman.
Kindest, Marlene Power
1. Link to Share on Social Media:

http://www.forestschoolcanada.ca/forest-and-nature-school-in-canada

2. PDF of Guide:

Screen Shot 2014-03-12 at 11.45.59 AMThe Green School National Network seeks presenters for the 5th annual Green Schools National Conference, set for March 4-7, 2015 in Virginia Beach, VA.

We are pleased to spread the word about this conference. Sponsored by the Green Schools National Network, the conference is a gathering place where K-12 school personnel, government entities, non-profit organizations and businesses dedicated to sustainability in K-12 schools can meet and discover ways to work together to make schools greener. Antioch University New England faculty and students have presented and attended this conference each year since it started, and this year Antioch alumna Jenny Seydel is conference coordinator

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Here are links to the network’s request for proposals:

  • We are seeking Conference Presentations for breakout sessions, speed greening sessions and poster sessions. The deadline to submit presentations is June 30Call for Presenters

See you in Virgina Beach, March 4-7, 2015!

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