What do glaciers, bottled water, building highways, and seashore erosion have in common?

by Tom Julius

What do glaciers, bottled water, building highways, and seashore erosion have in common?

Global climate change for one.

Last night I had the wonderful experience of participating in the Surry Village Charter School 7th and 8th grade exhibition on Global Climate Change. Students displayed library research they had done in conjunction with the Student Climate Data project using the NASA Innovations in Climate Education curriculum. To find out more you can click the links in this post or check out the School, Curriculum, and Organization pages that are part of this website.

This was a great example of how to do Climate Change in a middle school classroom in a way that engages students in thinking about the Environment, Economics and Social Equity. They analyzed information and data from their library research, and discussed the ways the 3E’s are inter-related.
Finally, they presented to an adult audience. Its important to note that these students in grades K-6 had lots of opportunities to engage with their local environment and connect with their immediate community.

However, there are lots of examples of how climate change curriculum can foster fear in children. Educating For Sustainability faculty member David Sobel recently discussed this in his presentation “Climate Change meets Ecophobia” at the New England Aquarium. Check out his whole talk in the video below or go to the Green Schools Conference, February 27-29 and see David talk about this topic in person.

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